Spine and Neck

Spine and Neck

Understanding your spine and how it works can help you better understand some of the problems that occur from aging or injury. Many demands are placed on your spine. It holds up your head, shoulders, and upper body. It gives you support to stand up straight, and gives you flexibility to bend and twist. It also protects your spinal cord.

To learn more about the neck and spine, please visit the links below.

Common Conditions of the Spine:

Neck Pain
The neck (cervical spine) is composed of vertebrae that begin in the upper torso and end at the base of the skull. The bony vertebrae along with the ligaments (which are comparable to thick rubber bands) provide stability to the spine. The muscles allow for support and motion.
More on Neck Pain

Lumbar Disc Herniation
Sometimes called a slipped or ruptured disk, a herniated disk most often occurs in your lower back. It is one of the most common causes of low back pain, as well as leg pain (sciatica).
More on Lumbar Disc Herniation

Spinal Stenosis
As we age, our spines change. These normal wear-and-tear effects of aging can lead to narrowing of the spinal canal. This condition is called spinal stenosis.
More on Spinal Stenosis

Spondylolysis and Spondylolisthesis
The most common cause of low back pain in adolescent athletes that can be seen on X-ray is a stress fracture in one of the bones (vertebrae) that make up the spinal column. Technically, this condition is called spondylolysis (spon-dee-low-lye-sis). It usually affects the fifth lumbar vertebra in the lower back and, much less commonly, the fourth lumbar vertebra.
More on Spondylolysis and Spondylolisthesis

Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fracture
A spinal fracture is a serious injury. The most common fractures of the spine occur in the thoracic (midback) and lumbar spine (lower back) or at the connection of the two (thoracolumbar junction). These fractures are typically caused by high-velocity accidents, such as a car crash or fall from height.
More on Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fracture

Scoliosis
This condition of side-to-side spinal curves is called scoliosis. On an x-ray, the spine of an individual with scoliosis looks more like an “S” or a “C” than a straight line. Some of the bones in a scoliotic spine also may have rotated slightly, making the person’s waist or shoulders appear uneven.
More on Scoliosis

 

All patient education material from www.AAOS.org