Shoulder

Shoulder

Your shoulder is the most flexible joint in your body. It allows you to place and rotate your arm in many positions in front, above, to the side, and behind your body. This flexibility also makes your shoulder susceptible to instability and injury.

Common Conditions of the Shoulder:

Shoulder Pain
What most people call the shoulder is really several joints that combine with tendons and muscles to allow a wide range of motion in the arm — from scratching your back to throwing the perfect pitch. Mobility has its price, however. It may lead to increasing problems with instability or impingement of the soft tissue or bony structures in your shoulder, resulting in pain. You may feel pain only when you move your shoulder, or all of the time. The pain may be temporary or it may continue and require medical diagnosis and treatment.
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Biceps Instability/Tendonitis
Long head of biceps tendonitis is an inflammation or irritation of the upper biceps tendon. This strong, cord-like structure connects the upper end of the biceps muscle to the bones in the shoulder. Pain in the front of the shoulder and weakness are common symptoms of biceps tendonitis. They can often be relieved with rest and medication. In some cases, surgery is necessary to repair the tendon.
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Rotator Cuff (RTC) Tear
Any type of irritation or damage to your rotator cuff muscles or tendons can be due to a rotator cuff tear. It can be a result from falling, lifting and repetitive arm activities, especially those done overhead. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means that many daily activities, like combing your hair or getting dressed, may become painful and difficult to do.
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Shoulder Dislocations
The shoulder joint is the body’s most mobile joint. It can turn in many directions. But, this advantage also makes the shoulder an easy joint to dislocate. A partial dislocation (subluxation) means the head of the upper arm bone (humerus) is partially out of the socket (glenoid). A complete dislocation means it is all the way out of the socket. Both partial and complete dislocation cause pain and unsteadiness in the shoulder.
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All patient education material from www.AAOS.org.